The Carnot-Carathéodory metric

March 22, 2011

I remember looking at Gromov’s notes “Carnot-Carathéodory spaces seen from within” a long time ago and didn’t get anywhere. Recently I encountered it again through professor Guth. This time, with his effort in explaining, I did get some ideas. This thing is indeed pretty cool~ So I decided to write an elementary introduction about it here. We will construct a such metric in \mathbb{R}^3.

In general, if we have a Riemannian manifold, the Riemannian distance between two given points p, q is defined as

\inf_\Gamma(p,q) \int_0^1||\gamma'(t)||dt

where \Gamma is the collection of all differentiable curves \gamma connecting the two points.

However, if we have a lower dimensional sub-bundle E(M) of the tangent bundle (depending continuously on the base point). We may attempt to define the metric

d(p,q) = \inf_{\Gamma'} \int_0^1||\gamma'(t)||dt

where \Gamma' is the collection of curves connecting p, q with \gamma'(t) \in E(M) for all t. (i.e. we are only allowed to go along directions in the sub-bundle.

Now if we attempt to do this in \mathbb{R}^3, the first thing we may try is let the sub-bundle be the say, xy-plane at all points. It’s easy to realize that now we are ‘stuck’ in the same height: any two points with different z coordinate will have no curve connecting them (hence the distance is infinite). The resulting metric space is real number many discrete copies of \mathbb{R}^2. Of course that’s no longer homeomorphic to \mathbb{R}^3.

Hence for the metric to be finite, we have to require accessibility of the sub-bundle: Any point is connected to any other point by a curve with derivatives in the E(M).

For the metric to be equivalent to our original Riemannian metric (meaning generate the same topology), we need E(M) to be locally accessible: Any point less than \delta away from the original point p can be connected to p by a curve of length < \varepsilon going along E(M).

At the first glance the existence of a (non-trivial) such metric may not seem obvious. Let’s construct one on \mathbb{R}^3 that generates the same topology:

To start, we first identify our \mathbb{R}^3 with the 3 \times 3 real entry Heisenberg group H^3 (all 3 \times 3 upper triangular matrices with “1”s on the diagonal). i.e. we have homeomorphism

h(x,y,z) \mapsto \left( \begin{array}{ccc}  1 & x & z \\  0 & 1 & y \\  0 & 0 & 1 \end{array} \right)

Let g be a left-invariant metric on H_3.

In the Lie algebra T_e(H_3) (tangent space of the identity element), the elements X = \left( \begin{array}{ccc}  1 & 1 & 0 \\  0 & 1 & 0 \\  0 & 0 & 1 \end{array} \right) , Y = \left( \begin{array}{ccc}  1 & 0 & 0 \\  0 & 1 & 1 \\  0 & 0 & 1 \end{array} \right) and Z = \left( \begin{array}{ccc}  1 & 0 & 1 \\  0 & 1 & 0 \\  0 & 0 & 1 \end{array} \right) form a basis.

At each point, we take the two dimensional sub-bundle E(H_3) of the tangent bundle generated by infinitesimal left translations by X, Y. Since the metric g is left invariant, we are free to restrict the metric to E(M) i.e. we have ||X_p|| = ||Y_p|| = 1 for each p \in M.

The interesting thing about H_3 is that all points are accessible from the origin via curves everywhere tangent to E(H_3). In other words, any points can be obtained by left translating any other point by multiples of elements X and Y.

The “unit grid” in \mathbb{R}^3 under this sub-Riemannian metric looks something like:

Since we have

\left( \begin{array}{ccc}  1 & x & z \\  0 & 1 & y \\  0 & 0 & 1 \end{array} \right) \left( \begin{array}{ccc}  1 & 1 & 0 \\  0 & 1 & 0 \\  0 & 0 & 1 \end{array} \right) = \left( \begin{array}{ccc}  1 & x+1 & z \\  0 & 1 & y \\  0 & 0 & 1 \end{array} \right) ,

the original x-direction stay the same, i.e. a bunch of horizontal lines connecting the original yz planes orthogonally.

However, if we look at a translation by Y, we have

\left( \begin{array}{ccc}  1 & x & z \\  0 & 1 & y \\  0 & 0 & 1 \end{array} \right) \left( \begin{array}{ccc}  1 & 0 & 0 \\  0 & 1 & 1 \\  0 & 0 & 1 \end{array} \right) = \left( \begin{array}{ccc}  1 & x & z+x \\  0 & 1 & y+1 \\  0 & 0 & 1 \end{array} \right)

i.e. a unit length Y-vector not only add a 1 to the y-direction but also adds a height x to z, hence the grid of unit Y vectors in the above three yz planes look like:

We can now try to see the rough shape of balls by only allowing ourselves to go along the unit grid formed by X and Y lines constructed above. This corresponds to accessing all matrices with integer entry by words in X and Y.

The first question to ask is perhaps how to go from (0,0,0) to (0,0,1). –since going along the z axis is disabled. Observe that going through the following loop works:

We conclude that d_C((0,0,0), (0,0,1)) \leq 4 in fact up to a constant going along such loop gives the actual distance.

At this point one might feel that going along z axis in the C-C metric is always takes longer than the ordinary distance. Giving it a bit more thought, we will find this is NOT the case: Imagine what happens if we want to go from (0,0,0) to (0,0,10000)?

One way to do this is to go along X for 100 steps, then along Y for 100 steps (at this point each step in Y will raise 100 in z-coordinate, then Y^{-100} X^{-100}. This gives d_C((0,0,0), (0,0,10000)) \leq 400.

To illustrate, let’s first see the loop from (0,0,0) to (0,0,4):

The loop has length 8. (A lot shorter compare to length 4 for going 1 unit in z-direction)

i.e. for large Z, it’s much more efficient to travel in the C-C metric. d_C( (0,0,0), (0,0,N^2)) = 4N

In fact, we can see the ball of radius N is roughly an rectangle with dimension R \times R \times R^2 (meaning bounded from both inside and outside with a constant factor). Hence the volume of balls grow like R^4.

Balls are very “flat” when they are small and very “long” when they are large.

Advertisements

7 Responses to “The Carnot-Carathéodory metric”

  1. Yunting Gao Says:

    Finally I can read your blog….
    So happy about it.

  2. Kostya Tolmachov Says:

    Hello, Conan.

    Why is this Lie algebra generated by matrices with 1 on diagonal? H_3 is a subgroup of SL(3), so it’s Lie algebra elements must have zero traces, am I right?

    And how to build continous curve using transformation of type 2 (multiplication by Y)?

    Sorry for my English and sorry if questions are stupid.

    Thank you!

    Kostya

    • 777 Says:

      Hi Kostya,

      Thanks a lot for the comment~
      When I say ‘Lie algebra’, in fact I meant since the space is itself linear, I’m considering the tangent space as embedded subspace at identity. Yes you are right that I should write all the element as the current ones minus identity and when I need to multiply them, add identity again…but hopefully the idea is pretty clear, right?
      Going from discrete to continuous is merely going infinitesimally to tangent vectors instead of multiply by the integer matrix Y each time, right? (i.e. Y in the Lie algebra determines a left-invariant vector field, hence one can find curves tangent to Y in the Lie group)

      Please note that I know very little about Lie groups, hence whatever I say about them perhaps contain many wrong terminolo >.<
      Feel free to point out any mistakes or suggest better ways to state things.

      Best,
      Conan

      • Kostya Tolmachov Says:

        Thank you for your answer!

        I’m myself very bad with Lie groups, sorry, it was rather obvious. But it is not about substracting identity of course, it’s about exponential map, in our case exp(X) = E + X (this is just to clear it for myself, I’m sure that this is what you originally said, and I just had not enough expirience to understand).

        All right, now it is clear, thank you very much for your post!

        Best,
        Kostya


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: